Chinatown Diaries, Summary of Previous Posts: Pacific Avenue Corridor

New Hollywood's pineapple bun (photo: Andrew Nilsen/SF Weekly)

Chinatown Diaries chronicles one man’s effort to eat at every restaurant and food shop in San Francisco’s Chinatown, surveying the neighborhood block by block, rice plate by rice plate. Maximum entree price permitted: $10. 

This Pacific Avenue directory is a catalogue of restaurants I have written about, either on SF Weekly‘s food blog or on my own. (See the interactive map for the full list of restaurants covered.) Please note that there are other restaurants and food shops on these streets, but these were the only ones worth writing about.

* = recommended

Ma’s Dim Sum & Cafe*
1315 Powell (at Pacific), (415) 788-3532
Serves: The baked goods are forgettable, but Ma’s serves awesome clay pot rice dishes, notably the clay pot rice with spare ribs and Chinese sausage.

Yee’s Restaurant*
1131 Grant (at Pacific), (415) 576-1818
Serves: Roast meats, Cantonese rice plates from inexpensive to splurge-y, and good noodle soups (especially topped with barbecued meats).

New Moon Restaurant
1247 Stockton (at Pacific), (415) 434-1128
Serves: Roast meats and humble (really humble) Cantonese stews and rice plates. Great roast pork.*

Dol Ho's shrimp balls (photo: Jonathan Kauffman/joanthankauffman.com)

Dol Ho
808 Pacific (at Stockton), (415) 392-2828
Serves: My first visit suggested a horrifying downhill slide, but Dol Ho has redeemed itself: Classic 1950s-era cafe with decent dim sum and legendary black-bean spareribs over rice. 

New Asia Restaurant
772 Pacific (at Stockton), (415) 391-6666, www.sfnewasia.com
Serves: Middling dim sum and pricey Cantonese fare; popular wedding spot.

Pacific Court Cafe
Meriwa shopping center, 728 Pacific (at Grant), Ste 118, 781-8312
Serves: Straight-up American diner fare. Breakfasts aren’t great; locals recommend the fried chicken and prime rib, both above this survey’s $10 price limit.

New Hollywood Bakery
652 Pacific (at Columbus), 397-9919
Serves: So-so rice plates with Hong Kong-style dishes; great pineapple buns and green-onion twists.*